By Lisa Perdue, Product Manager
 

ThreatBlocker from Orolia and Talen-X is an inline device that detects and prevents jamming and spoofing. This demo shows how it works.

By Frederic Silva, Global Business Development Director, Intelligent Transport Systems
 
Over the last few years, jamming and spoofing have been clearly identified as a major GNSS cybersecurity risk. High-end GNSS testing technologies and risk mitigation solutions have been deployed and enhanced for a growing number of Aerospace, Defense and Government (ADG) applications ... but only recently has anyone been thinking about them specifically for commercial infrastructure.
By Frederic Silva, Global Business Development Director, Intelligent Transport Systems
 
More than 2,000 billion Euros of critical infrastructures around the world are directly dependent upon GPS every day – including public and private, aerospace and defense, smart cities, IoT, finance, industry, automotive, ITS, mobility, broadcast and telecom, and Cloud. All benefit from this accurate and trustable PNT service to support their operations.
By Mike Sutton, Applications Engineer
 
Orolia had the privilege of participating in the Special Operations Command (SOCOM) Technical Experimentation event at the Muscatatuck Urban Training Complex, Indiana in late March. During this event, the Army scouted new technologies that provide positioning, navigation and timing (PNT) in GPS-denied environments.
By John Fischer, VP, Advanced R&D
 
A customer with a major datacenter facility was experiencing issues with its GNSS based timing systems. We demonstrate how they overcame interference using a low-cost anti-jam (AJ) antenna.
By Jon Sinden, Product Manager, Mobile Mission Systems
 
When considering GNSS security, maintaining the integrity of the signal provides protection against spoof attack that aim to fool the receiver’s perception location and time.
By John Fischer, VP, Advanced R&D
 
Spectracom has introduced a new Anti-Jam (AJ) antenna for its GNSS-based timing systems that combats interference by limiting the antenna’s reception near the horizon. The antenna’s beam is focused at the zenith – where most of the GNSS satellites are – and away from the horizon, where most interference comes from.
By Jeremy Onyan, Director of Time Sensitive Networks
 

In 2013, the Federal Communications Commission fined a person almost $32k for using a device intended to evade the fleet management tracking system on his company vehicle. The device in question: a GPS jammer.

By Stéphane Hamel
 
 For more than a decade now, we’ve been warned about the vulnerabilities of GNSS and the risks of jamming, as well as the general lack of robustness of GNSS-enabled devices to various interferences. Despite recent examples that the situation is both real and serious, not much has been done since to make the various GNSS/GPS devices that we use daily better able to resist adverse conditions.