By Lisa Perdue, Product Manager
 
The development of autonomous vehicles for road, rail and water demands a comprehensive and repeatable test plan for GNSS. This white paper discusses and outlines testing methods for GNSS performance and vulnerabilities.
By Lisa Perdue, Product Manager
 

When it is time to test your device with an embedded GNSS receiver, there are several test methods. You can use the live sky signal, a record and playback device or a GNSS simulator.  However, when it is time to test your GNSS equipment designed to operate in space, live sky signal and record and playback are typically not options. You need a GNSS simulator. And not just any simulator: You need one designed to test GNSS receivers used in space-based applications.

By Frederic Silva, Global Business Development Director, Intelligent Transport Systems
 

Today, GPS position capabilities are commonly integrated into vehicles by many major automotive manufacturers and suppliers, along with other signals like radio, TV, Bluetooth, Wifi, and GPS. All these systems need to be thoroughly tested by suppliers and integrated into cars during multiple phases by R&D, Validation and Production.

By Stéphane Hamel
 
 For more than a decade now, we’ve been warned about the vulnerabilities of GNSS and the risks of jamming, as well as the general lack of robustness of GNSS-enabled devices to various interferences. Despite recent examples that the situation is both real and serious, not much has been done since to make the various GNSS/GPS devices that we use daily better able to resist adverse conditions.
By Stéphane Hamel
 
 When we developed SDX, we decided to tackle the complexity of creating GNSS automation scripts by building automation right into the core of the software. The result is an easy-to-use, yet very powerful automation toolset.
By Stéphane Hamel
 
We’re often asked why we promote GPU-accelerated computing as our product differentiator. In short, what benefits does using this software-defined architecture for GNSS simulation offer the user?
By Stéphane Hamel
 
Some applications, such as surveying or even large-scale farming, require high positioning performance which can be achieved with RTK. Real Time Kinematic works by using a base station whose position is well-known, and a rover.