By Robyn Federman, Head of Global Commercial Marketing
 
You may think that if your GPS/GNSS receiver is tested, you don’t have to use a simulator. But your design can change everything, and it may not behave as expected post-integration and in the field.
By Robyn Federman, Head of Global Commercial Marketing
 
A major commercial aerospace manufacturer needed to launch small cube satellites into Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Medium Earth Orbit (MEO), with small to medium sized payloads that supported Commercial Lunar Payload Services. Their goal was to simulate GNSS signals with their rockets, each of which had two antennas.
By Robyn Federman, Head of Global Commercial Marketing
 
Military aviation programs provide standard pilot training to ensure that they can handle fighters, drone swarms and other advanced threats. But as they run complex flight training scenarios and face off against live and virtual adversaries, what may be overlooked is the value of using GPS/GNSS simulation to duplicate actual cockpit instruments, rather than relying on facsimile instruments.
By Robyn Federman, Head of Global Commercial Marketing
 
An Orolia customer required flawlessly synchronized receivers on two different Low Earth Orbits (LEO) with a time difference that could not exceed extremely tight constraints – within +/-100 picoseconds (ps).
By Frederic Silva, Global Business Development Director, Intelligent Transport Systems
 
Like Europe’s eCall directive, other countries or international organizations are translating their own interpretation of AECS (Accident Emergency Call Systems) and associated tests to get car systems certified in a specific country or region of the world.
By Lisa Perdue, Product Manager
 
GPS week zero started January 6, 1980. The 1024 weeks counter ran out and rolled over on August 21, 1999. The week counter then reset to zero, and it has been recounting ever since. The next time the counter will reach week 1023 and rollover to zero is on April 6, 2019.
By Lisa Perdue, Product Manager
 

As GPS receivers are built into more mission-critical devices for difficult application environments, and designed with the emerging capabilities of a multitude of GNSS constellations and augmentation systems, developers and manufacturers need better ways to guarantee performance. That’s where GPS signal generation comes in.

By Lisa Perdue, Product Manager
 

On April 16, 2014, the European Union published a new directive: The Radio Equipment Directive 2014/53/EU. This directive replaced the former Directive on Radio and Telecommunications Terminal Equipment (R&TTE) and has been in effect since June 13, 2016.