By Robyn Federman, Head of Global Commercial Marketing
 

It’s no secret that GPS/GNSS jamming and spoofing are on the rise. The federal government’s PNT Executive Order specifically aims to protect critical infrastructure from these threats and other disruptions to critical PNT services. That’s why it’s important to protect your critical systems with GPS jamming and spoofing detection technology like BroadShield.

By Robyn Kahn Federman and Sheri Ascencio, Orolia Marketing Team
 
These days, it’s easier than ever to disrupt GPS/GNSS signals and systems that rely on accurate Positioning, Navigation and Timing (PNT) data -- and nearly every critical system around the world depends on these signals and data. When it comes to military systems, failure isn’t an option. How can you protect essential systems from interference and denial of service attacks?
By Lisa Perdue, Product Manager
 

ThreatBlocker from Orolia and Talen-X is an inline device that detects and prevents jamming and spoofing. This demo shows how it works.

By Jeremy Onyan, Director of Time Sensitive Networks
 
A major international financial services provider was losing its GNSS reception and they didn't know why. Here's how Orolia solved the problem.
By Frederic Silva, Global Business Development Director, Intelligent Transport Systems
 
Over the last few years, jamming and spoofing have been clearly identified as a major GNSS cybersecurity risk. High-end GNSS testing technologies and risk mitigation solutions have been deployed and enhanced for a growing number of Aerospace, Defense and Government (ADG) applications ... but only recently has anyone been thinking about them specifically for commercial infrastructure.
By John Fischer, VP, Advanced R&D
 
As is widely understood, GPS signals are weak and vulnerable to interference. Interference can be unintentional, such as side band energy from radio transmissions on the battlefield, or intentional. Intentional interference can be jamming or it can be a fake signal, sometimes called spoofing or sophisticated jamming. Spoofing is potentially the most dangerous type of interference. Connectivity and signal disruption is one issue; acting on misinformation or falsified data could be catastrophic.
By John Fischer, VP, Advanced R&D
 
Today's time sensitive networks rely on available and accurate positioning, navigation and timing (PNT) signals to provide leaders with the information required to make timely and effective decisions. The proliferation of GNSS-degrading and denying devices across state and non-state actors put this critical information capability in jeopardy. Learn how a combination of alternative PNT signals with traditional GNSS references makes PNT applications resilient against jamming and spoofing.
By John Fischer, VP, Advanced R&D
 
While the use of GNSS – more commonly known as GPS – is now widespread, the signal itself comes from satellites that are 20,000 kilometers away, making it fairly weak and subject to loss of signal or interference. For military operations, this presents several challenges. In a recent naval exercise, a scenario of GPS denial triggered up to 48 shipboard systems to generate alerts when GPS was lost. This shows how GPS is so pervasive and deeply integrated into many military systems for air, land and sea.
By Frederic Silva, Global Business Development Director, Intelligent Transport Systems
 
More than 2,000 billion Euros of critical infrastructures around the world are directly dependent upon GPS every day – including public and private, aerospace and defense, smart cities, IoT, finance, industry, automotive, ITS, mobility, broadcast and telecom, and Cloud. All benefit from this accurate and trustable PNT service to support their operations.
By Mike Sutton, Applications Engineer
 
Orolia had the privilege of participating in the Special Operations Command (SOCOM) Technical Experimentation event at the Muscatatuck Urban Training Complex, Indiana in late March. During this event, the Army scouted new technologies that provide positioning, navigation and timing (PNT) in GPS-denied environments.

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