By Jon Sinden, Product Manager, Mobile Mission Systems
 
Maintaining a state of military readiness is a top priority for defense agencies. The ideal approach would deliver a consistent solution that is cost-effective across different platforms, with the ability to provide a compatible, scalable system to all of them. Expensive, inflexible A-PNT solutions will not solve the total problem. To provide affordable A-PNT for every link in the communications chain, a different approach is needed.
By Scott Hildebrandt, Senior Program Manager
 
To improve performance of your radar system or signal intelligence (SIGINT) receiver, you need a time and frequency reference that can deliver a low phase noise signal. If your mission is signal intelligence gathering, then that means deeper penetration and more intelligence gathered.
By Ron Dries, Applications Engineer
 
With the built-in REST API of Orolia PNT products, any functionality that can be done manually through the web GUI can also be scripted, allowing for machine-to-machine communication and control. The REST API utilizes JSON (JavaScript Object Notation) formatted data for sending commands and receiving status information from the devices.
By John Fischer, VP, Advanced R&D
 
As is widely understood, GPS signals are weak and vulnerable to interference. Interference can be unintentional, such as side band energy from radio transmissions on the battlefield, or intentional. Intentional interference can be jamming or it can be a fake signal, sometimes called spoofing or sophisticated jamming. Spoofing is potentially the most dangerous type of interference. Connectivity and signal disruption is one issue; acting on misinformation or falsified data could be catastrophic.
By John Fischer, VP, Advanced R&D
 
Today's time sensitive networks rely on available and accurate positioning, navigation and timing (PNT) signals to provide leaders with the information required to make timely and effective decisions. The proliferation of GNSS-degrading and denying devices across state and non-state actors put this critical information capability in jeopardy. Learn how a combination of alternative PNT signals with traditional GNSS references makes PNT applications resilient against jamming and spoofing.
By John Fischer, VP, Advanced R&D
 
While the use of GNSS – more commonly known as GPS – is now widespread, the signal itself comes from satellites that are 20,000 kilometers away, making it fairly weak and subject to loss of signal or interference. For military operations, this presents several challenges. In a recent naval exercise, a scenario of GPS denial triggered up to 48 shipboard systems to generate alerts when GPS was lost. This shows how GPS is so pervasive and deeply integrated into many military systems for air, land and sea.
By Frederic Silva, Global Business Development Director, Intelligent Transport Systems
 
More than 2,000 billion Euros of critical infrastructures around the world are directly dependent upon GPS every day – including public and private, aerospace and defense, smart cities, IoT, finance, industry, automotive, ITS, mobility, broadcast and telecom, and Cloud. All benefit from this accurate and trustable PNT service to support their operations.
By Mike Sutton, Applications Engineer
 
Orolia had the privilege of participating in the Special Operations Command (SOCOM) Technical Experimentation event at the Muscatatuck Urban Training Complex, Indiana in late March. During this event, the Army scouted new technologies that provide positioning, navigation and timing (PNT) in GPS-denied environments.
By John Fischer, VP, Advanced R&D
 
A customer with a major datacenter facility was experiencing issues with its GNSS based timing systems. We demonstrate how they overcame interference using a low-cost anti-jam (AJ) antenna.
By John Fischer, VP, Advanced R&D
 
Spectracom has introduced a new Anti-Jam (AJ) antenna for its GNSS-based timing systems that combats interference by limiting the antenna’s reception near the horizon. The antenna’s beam is focused at the zenith – where most of the GNSS satellites are – and away from the horizon, where most interference comes from.

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